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BioQuant - Articles and news items

Figure 2: Showing 96 and 384 well micro-plates which have has gel based bioreactor system incorporated within the body of the plate in regions in between and surrounding the wells

A reduction to practise for siRNA screening utilising high conent analysis (HCA) technologies

Issue 3 2012, Screening / 10 July 2012 / Anthony Mitchell Davies & Anne Marie Byrne, Department of Clinical Medicine Trinity College Dublin; Holger Erfle, BIOQUANT-Zentrum Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg; Graham Donnelly, Rita Murray & Peadar MacGabhann, Biocroi Ltd

One of the major limitations of performing large-scale High Content Analysis (HCA) screens is reagent cost, indeed this fact has been a key driver in the development of assay size reduction strategies here at The Irish National Centre for High Content Screening and Analysis at Trinity College’s Department of Medicine.

As well as the obvious financial advantages of reducing assay volumes, we have also identified other key benefits to this approach, namely: Higher throughput; Improved signal to noise; Suited for the use of valuable cells, e.g. primary cells; Reduced storage and research space; Improved mixing of reagents.

The practicalities of performing cell based assays at the nano-litre scale: Despite the clear benefits to adopting miniaturisation, there are several significant barriers that must be overcome before these methods can be utilised. These are sample delivery / handling and environmental stability.

High throughput and high content screening microscopy: A microscopy based guideline

Issue 4 2009, Past issues / 30 July 2009 /

The understanding of properties of any biological system requires a detailed and quantitative analysis of its parts and their interactions. As different processes within a system occur at defined space and time, each process holds its own optimal observation and investigation technique. One of the most powerful tools to analyse biological samples quantitatively is based on fluorescence microscopy. Comprehensive studies of diverse biological processes were lately performed by fluorescence screening microscopy, which came up extensively during the last decade1,2,3.

Utilisation of secondary screening

Issue 3 2008, Past issues / 19 June 2008 /

European Pharmaceutical Review has brought together four individuals from different sides of the scientific palette to discuss current and future issues surrounding secondary screening and maximising its potential.

 

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