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Cell-Based Assays for Screening - Articles and news items


Rapidly develop drugs targeting Interleukins with new PathHunter® cell-based assays from DiscoveRx

Supplier news / 12 January 2016 / DiscoveRx

DiscoveRx Corporation announces the expansion of its PathHunter® cell-based assays portfolio with the release of PathHunter Interleukin cell-based assays…

Cell based assays workshop

May 2014: Cell based assays for screening workshop

Past events / 30 September 2014 / European ScreeningPort

Practical workshop covering the development of cell based assays for screening.

Cell based assays workshop

June 2013: Cell based assays for screening

Past events / 30 September 2014 / European Screening Port

Practical workshop covering the development of cell based assays for screening.

Figure 1: Principle of protein fragment complementation. Two interacting proteins are fused to N and C terminal fragments of a fluorescent or luminescent reporter protein (generic depicted in yellow). Upon interaction, the activity of the reporter is reconstituted and can be read out as fluorescence upon excitation (2) or as luminescence upon substrate addition (3)

Cell-based assays for protein-protein interactions

Issue 5 2013, Screening / 22 October 2013 / Mark Wade, Center for Genomic Science of IIT@SEMM

Protein-protein interactions (PPI) form the backbone of all cellular signalling networks, and aberrant PPI contribute to the pathology of several diseases. Thus, strategies to identify PPI modulators are expected to be therapeutically beneficial. However, there are very few examples of clinically approved PPI modulators, reflecting the difficulties of identifying effective compounds for this target class. This perspective reviews the challenges associated with targeting PPI, and summarises the major strategies used to detect and disrupt PPI, with a particular focus on cell-based assays for PPI.

Cell based label-free assays in GPCR drug discovery

GPCRs: Cell based label-free assays in GPCR drug discovery

Drug Targets, Issue 4 2013 / 20 August 2013 / Niklas Larsson, Linda Sundström, Erik Ryberg and Lovisa Frostne (AstraZeneca)

G protein-coupled receptors are one of the major classes of therapeutic targets for a broad range of diseases. The most commonly used assays in GPCR drug discovery measure production of second messengers such as cAMP or IP3 that are the result of activation of individual signalling pathways. Such specific assays are unable to provide a holistic view of the cell response after GPCR activation. This is now changing as label-free technologies and assays on whole cells have been developed that are unbiased towards the specific downstream pathways and capture the integrated cell response. In this mini-review, we focus on the application of one of these technologies, namely resonant waveguide grating (RWG) for measurements of dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) in intact cells upon GPCR activation. Since the technology is sensitive and non-invasive, it is applicable to most cell types, including primary cells with native receptor expression levels. We discuss how DMR assays have become an important component of GPCR drug discovery screening cascades and may have the potential to improve the ability to predict if compounds will be efficacious in vivo.

Stem Cells Supplement 2013

Stem Cells: In-depth focus 2013

Genomics, Issue 2 2013, Supplements / 17 April 2013 / Katharina Drews, James Adjaye, Annette Meeson, George E. Plopper

The promise held by induced pluripotent stem cells for research and regenerative medicine.
Workshop preview – Cell based assays for screening.
Cardiac stem cells.
Stem Cells Roundtable.


Collaboration to accelerate drug discovery in cardiac disease announced

Industry news, News / 19 March 2013 / InvivoSciences Inc.

Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies and InvivoSciences collaborate to accelerate drug discovery in cardiac disease…

Practical Workshop – Biochemical Assays for Screening

Issue 1 2013 / 21 February 2013 / Sheraz Gul, Head of Biology at European ScreeningPort, Hamburg, Germany

Recent years have witnessed an expansion in the disciplines encompassing drug discovery outside the pharmaceutical industry. This is most notable with a significant number of universities worldwide that now host infrastructure such as compound libraries and automated screening centres[1-3]. An archetypal small molecule drug discovery project will aim to identify chemical starting points that modify the functions of genes, cells or biochemical pathways. In some, but not all instances, these functions may be linked to disease processes, and an opportunity will exist to further develop the probes into novel therapeutic agents. In small molecule drug discovery, the ultimate aim is to identify new therapeutics, an activity which for reasons of high risk and cost has historically been conducted within the commercial sectors[4].


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