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Michael J. Miller - Articles and news items

Article 3: The implementation of rapid microbiological methods

Rapid micro methods and EMA’s post approval change management protocol

Issue 2 2012, Microbiology / RMMs / 26 April 2012 / Michael J. Miller, President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the second paper in our continuing series on Rapid Microbiological Methods that will appear in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2012. In my last article, we discussed a number of myths or misconceptions associated with the validation and implementation of rapid microbiological methods (RMMs). In fact, most RMM myths that have been circulating throughout our industry are not true or have been exaggerated to the point that many companies continue to be hesitant in exploring what RMMs have to offer.

One of the most prominent myths is that the regulators do not understand, accept or even encourage the use of rapid methods. I submit to you that the regulators want to see RMMs implemented, as their use is directly aligned with the future state of pharmaceutical manufacturing, QbD, PAT and continuous process and product improvement. Further – more, recent changes to regulatory guidance and proposed policy have made it easier to implement RMMs than ever before. In my last article, I introduced a relatively new process that the European Medicines Agency (EMA) launched that allows for the review and approval of RMM validation strategies before testing is initiated. A more thorough review of this process, better known as the Post Approval Change Management Protocol (PACMP), is presented herein.

Practical Application of a Rapid Microbiological Method (RMM) in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

New year, old challenges!

Issue 1 2012, Microbiology / RMMs / 28 February 2012 / Michael J. Miller, President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the first of many articles in our continuing series on Rapid Microbiological Methods that will appear in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2012. For the past two years, I have enjoyed sharing with you a broad range of topics associated with the validation and implementation of rapid microbiological methods (RMMs), including:

– A review of the history of conventional micro – biology and the benefits of using RMMs
– Validation strategies
– Perspectives from the regulatory authori – ties, including FDA and EMA
– Overviews of currently available tech – nologies, including those based on the growth of microorganisms, detection of cellular targets, optical spectroscopy, nucleic acid amplification and gene sequencing, viability staining and laser excitation, as well as micro-electro-mechanical systems, or MEMS.

In addition to my articles, numerous companies have published their success stories of RMM selection, validation and implementation, for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, sterility testing, bioburden analyses, water testing, environmental monitoring and the detection of Mycoplasma and other micro – organisms.

Lab-on-a-chip cell culture for metabolomics

Detection of microorganisms using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)

Issue 6 2011, Microbiology / RMMs / 13 December 2011 / Michael J. Miller, President, Microbiology Consultants

This is the sixth and final article in our series on Rapid Microbiological Methods (RMMs) that have appeared in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2011. In our last article, we reviewed the world of nucleic acid amplification technologies, including PCR-DNA amplification, RNA-based reverse-transcriptase amplification, 16S rRNA typing and gene sequencing for the detection, identification, and in some cases, the enumeration of microorganisms. In our last article of the year, we will explore one of the most exciting areas in microbiological detection and miniaturisation: Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems, or MEMS.

Imagine, for a moment, a machine so small that the human eye cannot see it and thousands of these machines are manufactured on a single piece of silicon. Imagine a future where gravity and inertia are no longer important, but atomic forces and surface sciences dominate. This is the world of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), and the future is now.

MEMS is the integration of mechanical, electrical, fluidic and optical elements, sensors and actuators on common silicon or other solid substrate through microfabrication technology. This is one of the fastest growing segments in the diagnostics and biomedical applications area, particularly for drug discovery and delivery, DNA testing and diagnostics, biotelemetry and genomics. And now, these same technologies are being introduced into the pharmaceutical sector for the rapid detection of contaminants. Examples of MEMS that have already been developed include Lab-On-A-Chip and microfluidics devices, microarrays, biosensors and other nanotechnology platforms.

Rapid Methods Supplement 2011

Rapid Methods supplement 2011

Issue 5 2011, Microbiology / RMMs, Supplements / 24 October 2011 / Bryan S. Riley, Michael J. Miller, Youwen Pan

A regulators view.
Microbiology series: Nucleic acid and gene amplification-based technologies.
Challenges and strategies for application in the pharmaceutical industry.

Detection of microorganisms using cellular component-based rapid method technologies

Detection of microorganisms using cellular component-based rapid method technologies

Issue 3 2011, Microbiology / RMMs / 20 June 2011 / Michael J. Miller, President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the third in a series of articles on rapid microbiological methods that will appear in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2011. In my last article, I provided an overview of viability-based rapid microbiological methods (RMMs), such as flow and solid-phase cytometry. In this article, we will review some of the currently available RMMs that fall under the category of cellular-component based technologies. These RMMs rely on the analysis of cellular markers or the use of probes that are specific for microbial target sites of interest. Examples include ATP bioluminescence, the detection of endotoxin and the use of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for microbial identification.

ATP bioluminescence is the generation of light by a biological process, and is most recognised in the tails of the American firefly Photinus pyralis. First discovered in 1947 by William McElroy, he described the ATP bioluminescence reaction in which ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) is enzymatically consumed to produce light.

Flow Cytometry

Article 2: Direct detection of microorganisms using viability-based technologies

Issue 2 2011, Microbiology / RMMs / 19 April 2011 / Michael J. Miller, President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the second in a series of articles on rapid microbiological methods that will appear in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2011. In my last article, I provided an overview of growth-based rapid microbiological methods (RMMs). This was a good place to start my review of RMM technologies, as most of us continue to use conventional agar and liquid medium for the growth of micro – organisms. In the current article, I will significantly depart from growing microorganisms to the direct detection of microorganisms using viability-based technologies, which will include flow cytometry and solid phase cytometry.

olaparib

Article 1 Rapid microbiological methods 2011

Issue 1 2011, Microbiology / RMMs / 16 February 2011 / Michael J. Miller, President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the first in a series of articles on rapid microbiological methods that will appear in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2011. Last year, I provided an overview of rapid microbiological methods (RMMs), including validation strategies, regulatory expectations, the technical and quality benefits of RMMs as compared with conventional techniques, and an overview of a variety RMM presentations and plenary sessions during the 5th Annual PDA Global Conference on Pharmaceutical Microbiology.

During the year I also provided updates on what was new and noteworthy in the world of rapid methods, through my blog on www.rapidmicromethods.com. The response to this series was so overwhelming, I was asked to repeat the series again in 2011. Of course, I couldn’t resist (actually, my response to continue to provide guidance on RMMs was quite rapid!). As there are literally dozens of different RMM technology platforms, and just as many applications that they can be used for, it was obvious that this series would need to demystify the task of matching the right rapid method with the right application. Therefore, it is necessary to review the types of systems that are currently available, and those that are in development.

cdi-1

The implementation of rapid microbiological methods

Issue 6 2010, Microbiology / RMMs / 16 December 2010 / Michael J. Miller, President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the sixth and final paper in a series of articles on rapid microbiological methods that have appeared in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2010. Over the past year, we have explored the world of rapid microbiological methods (RMMs), focusing on validation strategies, regulatory expectations, and the technical and quality benefits of these novel systems as compared with conventional techniques. It should be obvious by now that RMMs will significantly impact the future of microbiology within the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. But don’t just take my word for it.

MERS-CoV

Article 5: The implementation of rapid microbiological methods

Issue 5 2010, Microbiology / RMMs / 1 November 2010 / Michael J. Miller, President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the fifth in a series of articles on rapid microbiological methods that will appear in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2010. In my previous four articles, I have provided an overview of the benefits of rapid microbiological methods (RMMs) as compared with conventional methods, validation strategies and regulatory perspectives on the implementation of RMMs, especially from the US FDA and the European Medicines Agency. Some regulatory authorities rely on the published literature as a means of staying current with regard to new technologies that are being introduced, in addition to which companies are implementing these technologies in their manufacturing facilities.

lonafarnib

Article 4: The implementation of rapid microbiological methods

Issue 4 2010, Microbiology / RMMs / 19 August 2010 / Michael J. Miller, President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the fourth in a series of articles on rapid microbiological methods that will appear in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2010. Believe it or not, today’s regulatory authorities encourage the use of rapid microbiological methods (RMMs), and when applicable, they have put policies in place that provide guidance on how to get a RMM approved. Because there are different regulatory perspectives on RMM implementation, a company should understand what each regulatory body expects with regard to validation, submission and implementation strategies. In my last article, I discussed a number of RMM implementation perspectives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In this article, I will focus on the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and their expectations on the introduction of new RMM technologies.

Article 3: The implementation of rapid microbiological methods

Article 3: The implementation of rapid microbiological methods

Issue 3 2010, Microbiology / RMMs, Past issues / 24 June 2010 / Michael J. Miller, Ph.D., President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the third in a series of articles on rapid microbiological methods that will appear in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2010. Rapid microbiological methods (RMMs) have been implemented by a number of companies around the world. In some cases, it is necessary to work with regulatory authorities in order to effectively introduce a RMM in place of an existing microbiology method. This is especially true if the existing method is incorporated in a previously approved regulatory dossier, such as a New Drug Application (NDA) or Marketing Authorisation.

Implementing chemometrics in late stage development and manufacturing

Article 2: The implementation of rapid microbiological methods

Issue 2 2010, Microbiology / RMMs / 9 May 2010 / Michael J. Miller, Ph.D., President, Microbiology Consultants, LLC

This is the second in a series of articles on rapid microbiological methods that will appear in European Pharmaceutical Review during 2010. Method validation is the process used to confirm that an analytical procedure employed for a specific test is reliable, reproducible and suitable for its intended purpose. All analytical methods need to be validated prior to their introduction into routine use and this is especially true for novel technology platforms such as rapid microbiological methods (RMMs).

 

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